Listen again: 24th March 2015

27 03 2015
Clifford Hume and ABS in the film Chance

Clifford Hume and ABS in the film Chance Photo: Michele Martinoli

Rosie chats on the phone to Canadian singer-songwriter Awna Teixeira about her new album Wild One and her current UK tour including a date at cosy Camden haunt The Green Note on 29th March. Awna toured and recorded for 14 years as a key member of Po’ Girl and has been releasing solo material since 2012.

Multi-award-winning filmmaker Jan Dunn tells us about an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds to shoot a feature based on Rose Tremain’s novel Sacred Country about six year old Mary Ward’s struggle to change gender in rural Suffolk in 1952, and how much the story means to her personally. She also speaks about her previous body of work and working with actors including Bob Hoskins and Brenda Blethyn.

Our coverage of the annual LGBT exhibition Loudest Whispers continues as Rosie talks to Hackney artist Caroline Halliday about wild knitting, making sculptures out of furniture and how a heart attack impacted her creative process and made her switch from writing to visual art.

Lead actor Clifford Hume tells us about his role in short film Chance which is on at at BFI Flare as part of the Fragile Things collection on Sunday 29th March. Chance explores love and loss via two characters, Amir and Trevor – one an asylum seeker with a dark past, one devastated by the loss of his wife. Composer Justine Barker also shares some of her music from the film.

24 March 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Annabelle Chvostek: This Night from the album Be the Media

2) Awna Teixeira: Blue Heart On Your Sleeve from the album Wild One

3) Doris Day: The Deadwood Stage from the film soundtrack Calamity Jane

4) Justine Barker: Chance from the film Chance 

5) Awna Teixeira: Yellow Moon from the album Wild One





Listen again: 17th March 2015

18 03 2015
Florence Pugh and Maisie Williams as Abbie and Lydia in The Falling Photo: Aimee Spinks/PR

Florence Pugh and Maisie Williams as Abbie and Lydia in The Falling

Rosie introduces a BFI Flare festival special edition.

She talks to co-writer/directors Christina Zeidler and John Mitchell, who are on the phone to discuss their Toronto-set rom-com Portrait of a Serial Monogamist, which screens on 22nd, 23rd and 24th March at BFI Southbank. Diane Flacks stars as Elsie, a 40-something lesbian who believes that the best way to never get your heart broken is to always leave first.

Acclaimed British director Carol Morley tells us about her follow up to the haunting Dreams of a Life. The Falling is set amidst the seething hormones of an English girls’ school in 1969 and screens at the BFI on 20th and 21st March. Carol describes how important particular songs were for establishing a mood on set and how she managed to get Tracey Thorn to provide music for her film.

Emma Smart, a BFI Flare Programmer since 2009, gives us the lowdown on the hot tickets at this year’s festival which opens on 19th March with Gus Van Sant protégé Justin Kelly’s debut I Am Michael starring James Franco. She tells us about the mammoth task of watching hundreds of films each year and picks out highlights including German director Monika Treut’s latest film, Of Girls and Horses, which will be showing on 25th and 27th March.

17 March 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Wallis Bird: Hardly Hardly from the album Architecture

2) Rae Spoon: Curse on Us from the album I Can’t Keep All of Our Secrets 

3) Dusty Springfield: The Look of Love from the album The Look of Love

4) Caroline Trettine: Statuesque from the album Gay Demo

5) Alice DiMicele: Ripple from the album Swim





Listen again: 10th March 2015

11 03 2015

Two FacedAlex Goldberg is our guest presenter this week while Rosie is gigging in Oxford.

Musician Michael Roulston tells us all about his up-coming gig with singer Sarah-Louise Young at the Crazy Coqs, which features songs from their album Two Faced. Michael remembers when he first met Sarah and what let to forming the duo Roulston & Young. Sarah, by the way, also stars in Nathan Evans’ short film Curtains, which screens at BFI Flare on the 29th. Roulston & Young perform at Crazy Coqs on 17th, 18th and 19th March.

On the phone from Berlin, tour guide Brendan Nash talks about his ebook A Walk Along the Ku’damm – Playground and Battlefield of Weimar Berlin, which traces the history of Berlin’s famous boulevard and those who lived there, including the artist Jeanne Mammen. Brendan also explains why he decided to turn his findings into an ebook rather than a tour he would guide himself.

Alexander Geist is back. He plugs his new single, Malediction, sings live in the studio and chats about the inspiration for his songs and his time in Berlin. Alex plays at The Irrepressibles’s After Party at The Garage in Highbury on 20th March.

10 March 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Roulston & Young: Gift Shop from the album Two Faced 

2) Marlene Dietrich and Margo Lion: Wenn die beste Freundin from the album Falling in Love Again – The Marlene Dietrich Collection

3) Alexander Geist: Malediction (live) – on the podcast

4) Alexander Geist: Malediction

5) Faye Patton: All Around Town from the album Dangerous Loving





Listen again: 3rd March 2015

10 03 2015
Alan Turing (Ian Hallard) teaching students (Laura Harling, Chris Levens) at Cambridge. Photo: Scott Rylander

Alan Turing (Ian Hallard) teaching students (Laura Harling, Chris Levens) at Cambridge.
Photo: Scott Rylander

Never mind Benedict Cumberbatch and The Imitation Game… Rosie hears from theatre director Matthew Parker about a way more psychedelic and surreal retelling of the life of Alan Turing: Lovesong of the Electric Bear. Matthew tells us how he came to stage the European premiere of Snoo Wilson’s last play and how the surreal style fits Alan’s persona. Lovesong of the Electric Bear plays at The Hope Theatre in Islington until 21st March.

Vocalist / artist / composer / producer and multi-instrumentalist Jamie McDermott of The Irrepressibles promotes his forthcoming audio visual extravaganza, where he and a multi-talented cast will recreate their three EP Nude set. Together with Chloe Treacher on cello and Will Harvey playing violin, Jamie performs three songs live in the studio and explains the concept of the Nude album. The Irrepressibles play Islington Assembly Hall on 20th March.

It’s LGBT adoption and fostering week! Blogger, writer and mum Carolyn Robertson talks about her personal experience of becoming an adoptive lesbian parent, her book Two Dads and her blog Sparkly Poo (thus named after her youngest imbibed some glitter). Carolyn set up the blog due to a lack of available information for would-be adoptive gay parents. Her children’s book Two Dads, is soon to be followed by Two Mums and a Menagerie.

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Soak: Sea Creatures from the album Before We Forgot How To Dream

2) Pet Shop Boys: Odd Man Out B-side from the single Thursday

3) The Irrepressibles: Arrow (live) – on the podcast

4) The Irrepressibles: Two Men in Love (live) – on the podcast

5) The Irrepressibles: Always on My Mind (live) – on the podcast

6) Roulston & Young: Perfect Match from the album Two Faced 





Listen again: 24th February 2015

8 03 2015
Ian Gelder as James Whales in Gods and Monsters at Southwark Playhouse. Photo: Annabel Vere

Ian Gelder as James Whales in Gods and Monsters at Southwark Playhouse
Photo: Annabel Vere

Described as exploring the ‘sometimes divine, sometimes monstrous landscape of obsession and desire’, Gods and Monsters is a play based on the life of Frankenstein director James Whale following his retirement from Hollywood. In the recent Southwark Playhouse production, written and directed by Russell Labey, Ian Gelder played the lead role. Ian talks to Rosie about portraying Whale and shares his own memories of coming out to his family.

Our new film critic Martha Margetson gives her view on Appropriate Behaviour, a new film directed by, and starring, Desiree Akhavan. She plays Shirin, whose Iranian family don’t know that she is bisexual. Martha gives Appropriate Behaviour a rave review. The film screens at BFI Flare Festival on 20th and 21st March.

Art critic Anna McNay and LGBT sociologist Natacha Kennedy preview a panel discussion about the Chevalier d’Eon (1728-1810). The Chevalier was a French diplomat, soldier and spy who appeared publicly as a man for almost fifty years before dressing as a woman for the last 33 years of his life, claiming to be female assigned at birth. Anna tells us that the Chevalier wrote an autobiography which was only published in 2001, while Natacha focuses on what can we learn from the Chevalier’s life as to how we approach contemporary discussion of gender. The event was part of Loudest Whispers, the annual exhibition of LGBT artists, which runs until 23rd April.

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) The Irrepressibles: Ship from the album Nude (Landscape)

2) Bruce Hubbard: Ol’ Man River from Broadway Show Album of Show Boat

3) Girlboy: Jennifer Lawrence

4) Awna Teixeira: Yellow Moon from the album Wild One





Listen again: 17th February 2015

8 03 2015
Teddy Projection

The Teddy Award is an LGBT film award presented during Berlin’s international film festival, the Berlinale.

Musical performer Tim McArthur chats to Rosie about his debut album Don’t Be Anything Less. He also tells us about getting his kit off in the revival of Bathhouse the Musical, which runs at Above the Stag from 25th February to 29th March.

The Teddy Award celebrates the best of current LGBT films at the Berlinale, Berlin’s international film festival. Out in South London’s co-producer Sabine Schereck takes a closer look at this special award that is now in its 29th year. While Wieland Speck, Chairman of the Teddy Award, remembers its beginnings, Flare Coordinator Muffin Hix describes how exciting it was being part of this year’s jury.   

Rosie chairs a debate featuring tech entrepreneur Robyn Exton and Elaine McKenzie, who ran popular women’s spaces The Glass Bar and Southopia, on whether our sense of LGBT community and purpose has been strengthened or weakened by the growth of online networking and apparent political advancement. Have so many fondly remembered gay venues closed down simply because we no longer need them now that we can get married and have kids? Or have we become complacent and lost something vital to our movement’s continued progress and our individual well-being? Elaine puts this development down to changes within the society and economy such as increased rents. Robyn points out that women enjoy going to one-off events and often find out about these online.

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Tim McArthur: Dangerous Cabaret from the album Don’t Be Anything Less

2) Soak: Sea Creatures from the album Before We Forgot How To Dream





Listen again: 10th February 2015

14 02 2015
Geoffrey Streatfeild (Daniel) and Julian Ovenden (John) in  My Night With Reg.  Photo: Johan Persson

Daniel (Geoffrey Streatfeild) and John (Julian Ovenden) at Guy’s party in My Night With Reg
Photo: Johan Persson

After two sell-out runs at Hampstead Theatre, the hit play Di and Viv and Rose is now enjoying a West End run at the Vaudeville Theatre. Rosie and journalist Laura Macdougall look at the play’s hilarious and heartbreaking portrayal of female friendship. Laura was absolutely taken by the play that starts in the 1980s when the girls share a flat in their student days. She particularly loved the way author Amelia Bullmore had written the individual characters. Di and Viv and Rose runs at the Vaudeville Theatre until 23rd May.

Cucumber, Russell T Davies’ latest depiction of contemporary gay male life currently showing weekly on Channel 4, has been heralded by the Guardian as the ‘television event of the week’, while the Arts Desk has criticised it as ‘bizarrely traumatic’. Our culture critic Wendy Baverstock found Cucumber lacking depth. She much preferred its sister-series Banana on e4 which is tighter, shorter and includes more female characters.

When Kevin Elyot penned My Night with Reg - about a group of gay men living and loving in the 1980s – the UK was in the grip of an AIDS crisis and there was no such thing as equal marriage. Robert Hastie’s revival twenty years later at the Donmar Warhouse is receiving 5-star reviews across the board. The production has now transferred to the Apollo Theatre, where writer Clayton Littlewood saw it for us. Clayton very much admired the dialogue, the structure and the acting. He highly recommends it and hopes to see the production again. My Night with Reg runs at the Apollo Theatre until 11th April.

 

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Girlboy: Jennifer Lawrence

2) Awna Teixeira: Yellow Moon from the album Wild One

3) David Bowie: Starman from the album Best of Bowie

4) DJ BPM & Benten: Dubship – for Resonance’s fundraising drive








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