Listen again: 28 April 2015

30 04 2015
Duck feather dress by Alexander McQueen as featured in the V&A exhibition 'Savage Beauty' Photo: firstVIEW

Duck feather dress by Alexander McQueen shown at the V&A exhibition Savage Beauty; Model: Magdalena Frackowiak Photo: firstVIEW

Actors Jonny Dickens and Lewis Rae from the cast of Rise Like a Phoenix join us for a fleeting visit to discuss Emelion Daly’s new play. At a get-together, it shows how five HIV positive men cope with the illness. Despite dealing with HIV, Jonny and Lewis explain that it is a comedy at heart. They also reveal the impact the play has had on audiences so far. Rise Like a Phoenix runs at Above the Stag theatre until 3 May.

Ben Walters, former Cabaret editor at Time Out, is now involved with the RVT Future campaign. While talking about the importance of the campaign in the light of the recent closure of many of London’s historic LGBT spaces, he also relays a fabulous tale from the venue’s colourful history – when Freddie Mercury took a heavily-disguised Lady Di to the Royal Vauxhall Tavern. David Mills also contributes to what becomes a rather heated debate.

However harmony is restored in the studio when they all rapturously praise Savage Beauty, the V&A’s retrospective of the work of the late designer Alexander McQueen. Comedian David Mills took a closer look for us and describes this immensely impressive immersive experience. He was particularly taken by the way fashion was presented as performance art. Savage Beauty is on at the Victoria & Albert Museum until 2 August.

28 April 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Dean Jones/Company: Company from the Original Broadway Cast Recording of Company

2) Queen: My Fairy King from the album Queen

3) David Bowie: Sue (or in a Season of Crime) from the album Nothing Has Changed

4) Sylvester: You Make Me Feel from the album Step II





Listen again: 21 April 2015

22 04 2015

h2h5u_mxWhat are the issues concerning LGBT voters in the run-up to the general election? David Robson, Chair of Wandsworth LGBT Forum, tells us about his forthcoming Vauxhall Question Time event taking place on 23 April at the Royal Vauxhall Tavern  with a panel including representatives of Labour, Conservative, Liberal Democrat and Green Parties. Writer and DJ Stewart Who also limbers up for his role as the Dimbleby figure overseeing proceedings on the night. They particularly discuss the uncertain future of the RVT itself and the erosion of so much gay history across London, as well as what questions have been submitted for the event.

Rosie spoke over the phone to playwright Dylan Costello in December about his plans to put on a London run of his play The Glass Protégé. Now that the production has opened at Park Theatre, where it runs until 9 May, he joins us live in the studio with his director Matthew Gould. The Glass Protégé is set in 1940s Hollywood and features a romance between two actors. Dylan discusses how bulging the Hollywood closet was back then and still is. Matthew describes how they rehearsed the play’s dual time frames, with the two separate casts not seeing each other for much of the process.

Choreographer Joseph Mercier, of the company PanicLab, tells us about his new show R.I.O.T. which comes to Stratford Circus on 30 April / 1 May and The Place on 27 May. R.I.O.T. was inspired by the student protests in Westminster Square and involves four performers playing superheroes caught in a series of personal and political conflicts. He contemplates the idea of political agency and how he felt he couldn’t be a superhero when he was standing overlooking Parliament Square and couldn’t reach his students who were trapped in the kettle. Also, he describes how they mixed performance genres, media and graphics to make the feel of a comic book become three-dimensional.

21 April 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Alexander Geist: Malediction

2) Frank Sinatra: I’ve Got You Under My Skin from the album Songs for Swingin’ Lovers! 

3) Gem Andrews: Vancouver from the album Vancouver

4) Nelson Riddle: Shades of Smolensic from Batman: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1966)

5) Soft Cell: Tainted Love from the album Non-Stop Erotic Cabaret





Listen again: 14th April 2015

19 04 2015
1980s badges (Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive, Bishopsgate Institute Archive)

1980s badges (Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive, Bishopsgate Institute Archive)

Rosie chats to Colin Clews, author of the blog Gay in the 80s, ahead of an event taking place at the Bishopsgate Institute on 21st April. LGBT London in the 1980s – The Media and the ‘Loony Left’ sees Colin and fellow speaker Linda Bellos OBE, who was leader of Lambeth Council during the late 80s, discussing the experiences of gay people living in the UK in this decade. He talks about his own coming out and first Pride marches as well as the media coverage at the time of HIV and AIDS.

Performance poet and writer Hannah Chutzpah tells us what she has in store for her appearance at Queer’Say at Tate Modern on 19th April. Her 2014 Edinburgh show Asking Nicely received a 5-star review from Three Weeks, a run during which her debut poetry pamphlet Alchemy, Treasure and Butterfly Wings was launched. She performs two poems, Permission and No Little Words.

Erik Tomlin and Chris Doyle of London Gay Symphonic Winds pop in to explain why the group, currently celebrating its 10th year, has decided to embrace all things geek with a host of sci-fi and game themes and costumes (plus a Tardis cake!) for their upcoming concert Geek on 18th April at St Sepulchre-without-Newgate. They pick out their personal favourites from an array of Star Trek, Doctor Who, Disney and more.

14 April 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Bronski Beat: Smalltown Boy from the album The Age of Consent

2) Paula Varjack: Dear Straight Girl from the EP Always Back Somewhere

3) Perfume Genius: All Along from the album Too Bright

4) Faye Patton: All Around Town from the album Dangerous Loving





Listen again: 7th April 2015

10 04 2015
If You Leave choreographed by Andrea Walker at the Blue Elephant Theatre

If You Leave choreographed by Andrea Walker at the Blue Elephant Theatre

Baylen Leonard is our guest presenter this week while Rosie is speaking at Edinburgh Science Festival.

He talks to Lincoln based performer and theatre maker Jon M Coleman as he rehearses his solo show How to Be a Man. Through personal stories, interviews, self help books, social assumptions, famous quotes and more, he investigates the core values of being a man. He and Baylen discuss masculinity in different social settings and the current perceived crisis in male identity. How to Be a Man runs at Ovalhouse from 8th – 11thApril.

Laura Macdougall speaks to Canadian author Ann-Marie MacDonald about her latest novel, Adult Onset, in which she draws heavily from her own life. Set over the course of a week in the life of Mary Rose MacKinnon, a 48-year-old who apparently ‘has it all’ – a wife, two small children and a successful career as an author. Adult Onset  takes a bold, unflinching look at parenthood, physical and emotional trauma, and how the scars of the past inform and affect the present.

Andrea Walker, artistic director of 201 dance company, choreographs a fusion of contemporary and street dance. He tells us about If You Leave, which explores a relationship between two young men.  It’s a piece based on personal events aiming at integrating LGBT realities into the hip-hop dance world. If You Leave is at the Blue Elephant Theatre from 16th – 18th April.

7 April 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Right Said Fred: You’re My Mate from the album Fredhead

2) Awna Teixeira: Yellow Moon from the album Wild One

3) Lucy Spraggan: Someone from the album Join the Club

4) Culture Club: Do You Really Want to Hurt Me from the album Kissing to Be Clever





Listen again: 31st March 2015

3 04 2015

22882816Rosie chats to Paula Varjack ahead of her performance at our very own spoken word event Queer’Say at Tate Modern on 19th April. Paula‘s multi-genre work explores identity and our desire for connection. She also discusses bisexual and queer identities, the relationship between money and art and The Anti Social Network, a show she developed after the death of a friend.

Patrick Gale‘s latest novel, A Place Called Winter, was inspired by his great-grandfather, who emigrated to Canada in the early 20th century. Patrick speaks to Laura Macdougall about crafting historical fiction and taking creative license with his own family history, and about writing a ‘great gay love story’. 

Rachel Lob-levyt, producer of the forthcoming TV documentary Louis Theroux: Transgender Kids, tells us about the young people they met at a pioneering gender clinic in San Francisco. She and Rosie also focus on children transitioning at a very early age and the journey their parents are on too. The resulting film of these stories airs on BBC2 at 9pm on 5th April.

31 March 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Paula Varjack: Dear Straight Girl from the EP Always Back Somewhere

2) Waldemaar: Paula Varjack from the album Schizolectric

3) Rae Spoon: dangerdangerdanger from the album Love Is a Hunter





Listen again: 24th March 2015

27 03 2015
Clifford Hume and ABS in the film Chance

Clifford Hume and ABS in the film Chance Photo: Michele Martinoli

Rosie chats on the phone to Canadian singer-songwriter Awna Teixeira about her new album Wild One and her current UK tour including a date at cosy Camden haunt The Green Note on 29th March. Awna toured and recorded for 14 years as a key member of Po’ Girl and has been releasing solo material since 2012.

Multi-award-winning filmmaker Jan Dunn tells us about an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds to shoot a feature based on Rose Tremain’s novel Sacred Country about six year old Mary Ward’s struggle to change gender in rural Suffolk in 1952, and how much the story means to her personally. She also speaks about her previous body of work and working with actors including Bob Hoskins and Brenda Blethyn.

Our coverage of the annual LGBT exhibition Loudest Whispers continues as Rosie talks to Hackney artist Caroline Halliday about wild knitting, making sculptures out of furniture and how a heart attack impacted her creative process and made her switch from writing to visual art.

Lead actor Clifford Hume tells us about his role in short film Chance which is on at at BFI Flare as part of the Fragile Things collection on Sunday 29th March. Chance explores love and loss via two characters, Amir and Trevor – one an asylum seeker with a dark past, one devastated by the loss of his wife. Composer Justine Barker also shares some of her music from the film.

24 March 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Annabelle Chvostek: This Night from the album Be the Media

2) Awna Teixeira: Blue Heart On Your Sleeve from the album Wild One

3) Doris Day: The Deadwood Stage from the film soundtrack Calamity Jane

4) Justine Barker: Chance from the film Chance 

5) Awna Teixeira: Yellow Moon from the album Wild One





Listen again: 17th March 2015

18 03 2015
Florence Pugh and Maisie Williams as Abbie and Lydia in The Falling Photo: Aimee Spinks/PR

Florence Pugh and Maisie Williams as Abbie and Lydia in The Falling

Rosie introduces a BFI Flare festival special edition.

She talks to co-writer/directors Christina Zeidler and John Mitchell, who are on the phone to discuss their Toronto-set rom-com Portrait of a Serial Monogamist, which screens on 22nd, 23rd and 24th March at BFI Southbank. Diane Flacks stars as Elsie, a 40-something lesbian who believes that the best way to never get your heart broken is to always leave first.

Acclaimed British director Carol Morley tells us about her follow up to the haunting Dreams of a Life. The Falling is set amidst the seething hormones of an English girls’ school in 1969 and screens at the BFI on 20th and 21st March. Carol describes how important particular songs were for establishing a mood on set and how she managed to get Tracey Thorn to provide music for her film.

Emma Smart, a BFI Flare Programmer since 2009, gives us the lowdown on the hot tickets at this year’s festival which opens on 19th March with Gus Van Sant protégé Justin Kelly’s debut I Am Michael starring James Franco. She tells us about the mammoth task of watching hundreds of films each year and picks out highlights including German director Monika Treut’s latest film, Of Girls and Horses, which will be showing on 25th and 27th March.

17 March 2015 by Outinsouthlondon on Mixcloud

 

For rights reasons the music is not on the podcast, but that’s what you could hear on the show:

1) Wallis Bird: Hardly Hardly from the album Architecture

2) Rae Spoon: Curse on Us from the album I Can’t Keep All of Our Secrets 

3) Dusty Springfield: The Look of Love from the album The Look of Love

4) Caroline Trettine: Statuesque from the album Gay Demo

5) Alice DiMicele: Ripple from the album Swim








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